Gathered Wisdom, March 2, 2021

A weekly collection of inspiration and resources for the journey, gathered from websites, books, and pass-alongs that have been shared with us. From The Wisdom Years – Spirituality for the Last Third of Our Lives.

You enter life a ship laden with meaning, purpose and gifts
sent to be delivered to a hungry world.
And as much as the world needs your cargo,
you need to give it away.
Everything depends on this.

– Greg Kimura –
From Daily Good, March 2, 2021

Encouragement in Difficult Times

from the Rev. Joanna Seibert
Daily Something

“We are not done yet. We may count our progress in inches. We may swim against the deep tides of greed and hate, but we are not done yet. Even if we do not live to see it all, we will be content to be the inspiration, to give all we have to free our world from fear.”—Steven Charleston, Daily Facebook Page.

Read Joanna Seibert’s thoughts on Charleston’s observation.

Consecrated by Circumstance and Need

from Fr. Ron Rolheiser
“Today the word consecration has lost much of its rich meaning. We have relegated the word to the sacristy and over-loaded it with connotations of purity and cult. That’s unfortunate because both what’s best in our humanity and our faith are forever trying to consecrate us. The needs and wounds of our world are constantly asking us to suspend our radical freedom, to set aside our own agendas, in order to serve.”

Read the essay.

Dining at the Table of the Lord

By Br. James Koester
Society of St. John the Evangelist

“It is true to say that Christ, who will be present to us in communion, comes first to those who are listening in ‘the word of God… living and active, sharper than any two-edged sword,’ and as the one who ‘speaks words that are spirit and life.’ We speak of the Real Presence, but we could just as easily speak of the real presences, for Jesus who comes to us in Bread and Wine, Body and Blood, comes to us first in gathered community, Word proclaimed, prayers offered, sins forgiven, and peace restored.”

Read the essay.

The Heart of Aging with Wisdom 

Series III and IV
Thursdays in March and April 2021
Webinar from Sage-ing International

The Heart of Aging series is a program offering rich opportunities for personal growth, suitable for people interested in aging with purpose, designed to engage and inspire participants with healthy, spirited conversation and interaction.

For more information.

Another Name for Every Thing 

Podcast from Fr. Richard Rohr
Center for Action and Contemplation

“Another Name for Every Thing” with Richard Rohr is a conversational podcast series on the deep connections between action and contemplation. Richard is joined by two students of the Christian contemplative path, Brie Stoner and Paul Swanson, who seek to integrate the wisdom amidst diapers, disruptions, and the shifting state of our world. Richard describes “the story” as the great patterns that are always true. We pull on the threads of love that are active when engaged in “the story,” play with metaphors that examine a new way of seeing the Cosmic Egg, the relationship between chaos and order, and the Universal Christ as the key to holding Cosmic Egg together.

Learn more about the podcast.

 

If you have something to add to Gathered Wisdom, send it to Marjorie George at
marjoriegeorge62@gmail.com

Gathered Wisdom is from The Wisdom Years, a ministry that invites older adults to deepening spirituality in the last third of their lives. If someone forwarded this to you, learn more about The Wisdom Years and subscribe to the site at
ww.wisdomyears.org.

Gathered Wisdom, Feb. 23

A weekly collection of inspiration and resources for the journey, gathered from websites, books, and pass-alongs that have been shared with us. From The Wisdom Years – Spirituality for the Last Third of Our Lives.


God does not stop loving us every time we do something wrong, and neither should we stop loving ourselves and each other for being less than perfect.

— Harold Kushner in How Good Do We Have to Be? by Harold Kushner

The Most Important Day of Your Life

By the Rev. Mike Marsh
What are you doing with all that has happened last year and particularly last week, asks the Rev. Mike Marsh. And what is all that doing with you? In a sermon preached on the first Sunday in Lent, Marsh reflects on what it means to be in the wilderness, where we  “bump up against our limitations and face our powerlessness.”

Read the sermon.

Making God’s Unconditional Love Visible

“Whenever, contrary to the world’s vindictiveness, we love our enemy, we exhibit something of the perfect love of God,” says Henri Nouwen in You Are the Beloved. Joanna Seibert, in her “Daily Something” post for February 18, remarks that Nouwen has given her – and us –  a Lenten list of forgiving practices to consider and invite the Spirit to change in us.

Read the post.

Season of Disfiguration: Season of Hope

“Today we find ourselves in a time of disfiguration, and the message of the Gospel is that God has been here before us. God has transfigured what in us is disfigured,” says Brother James Koester of the Society of St. John the Evangelist in an Ash Wednesday post.  He reminds us that, in his act divine self-emptying, God did much more than simply take on human flesh. “God took on our limitations, our finitude, even our disfiguration, by submitting to death, disease, and loss; pain, grief, and sorrow; boredom, loneliness, and fatigue; worry, anxiety, and disquiet. God took all this on in the person of Jesus, and that is a thing full of wonder.”

Read the full post.

Taking Stock of Our Lives

“Lent is the process of emptying our cups,” says Sister Joan Chittister. “Lent is a time for trimming the soul and scraping the sludge off a life turned slipshod. Lent is about taking stock of time, even religious time. Lent is about exercising the control that enables us to say no to ourselves so that when life turns hard of its own accord, we have the spiritual stamina to say yes to its twists and turns with faith and with hope.”

Read the essay in Sister Joan’s weekly newsletter.

Prayers for the World

Join Shalem Institute’s weekly half-hour Prayer for the World sessions by phone. The intention is to hold our planet in compassion, light and love and to listen for what the Spirit is inviting in our current world situation. The time together will include a brief guided meditation, naming of areas of the planet in need, and silence.

To learn more.

Online Contemplative Photography Group

Since last August, a community of photographers at all skill levels has been gathering at SpiritualityandPractice.com to practice contemplative photography. Participants share photos in response to a weekly theme. The atmosphere is one of acceptance, encouragement, and delight in the wonders that this artistic medium opens.

Registration for the group opens at the beginning of the year and mid-year, which is now. This round of registration closes February 28.

For more information.

Wisdom for Times of Crisis

A 4-part online workshop series
From Sage-ing International
Facilitated by Ron Pevny, author of Conscious Living, Conscious Aging

Wednesdays
March 31, April 7, 14, 21
3:00 pm – 5:30 pm ET

Throughout our lives we experience many transitions — passages between one social role and another, passages between stages in our development throughout the human lifespan, and passages that mark significant growth opportunities at whatever life stage we are in. Successfully moving and growing through change—as opposed to trying futilely to hold on to a past that no longer supports true aliveness—requires that certain dynamics be recognized, honored and supported. 

For details.

If you have something to add to Gathered Wisdom, send it to Marjorie George at
marjoriegeorge62@gmail.com

Gathered Wisdom is from The Wisdom Years, a ministry that invites older adults to deepening spirituality in the last third of their lives. If someone forwarded this to you, learn more about The Wisdom Years and subscribe to the site at
ww.wisdomyears.org.

Gathered Wisdom, Feb 9

A weekly collection of inspiration and resources for the journey, gathered from websites, books, and pass-alongs that have been shared with us. From The Wisdom Years – Spirituality for the Last Third of Our Lives.

Hope is the basis for taking responsibility; for claiming our capacity to create, to make a genuinely new thing. It is also the springboard for trying to act justly; and for accepting absolutely our incorporation into each other. It is not simply that we share with each other a common humanity, but that individually we have no humanity without each other.

— Sara Maitland in A Big Enough God by Sara Maitland

From Spirituality and Practice

Praying So as Not to Lose Heart

By Fr. Ron Ronheiser

“One of the reasons we need to pray is so that we don’t lose heart. We all do sometimes. We lose heart whenever frustration, tiredness, fear, and helplessness in the face of life’s humiliations conspire together to paralyze our energies, deaden our resiliency, drain our courage, and leave us feeling weak in depression.”
 
Read the full essay.

The Little Girl and the Parrot

A Valentine story from Joan Chittister

“It was a mystical moment. The bird and child locked in some kind of preternatural condition. Lady moved slowly and sweetly to Brigid’s fingers, and Brigid leaned over and smiled a smile as fragile as the dew. The sense of satisfied love and shy spiritual awe on her small face lit up the entire room.”

Read this sweet story.

Life In The Deserted Place

By the Rev. Mike Marsh

“When was the last time you said to yourself, ‘I really want to go to a deserted place; a barren, empty, and desolate place; a lonely place; a place without water; a place that is wild and risky; a place where anything might happen; a place where if you get lost they might not find you?’ My guess is that nobody wants to go to that place and yet we’ve all been there.” 

From a sermon preached Feb. 7, 2021 at St. Philip’s Episcopal Church, Uvalde TX

Read the sermon.

Open Hands and Willing Hearts

An online course from Shalem Institute
Course material available Feb. 14 to Apr 4

Recognizing and living into one’s call is a lifelong process of discernment. In this online class, Patience Robbins and Margaret Pfeil will invite you to look at your life, no matter what age, and notice your unique contribution to God’s vision. This Lent, lean into spaciousness and learn to become more receptive to the ways the spirit is guiding you with this six-session series. Listen to stories of discernment and engage in enriching experiential exercises.

For more information.

Pass on the Gratefulness – Send an e-card

From A Network for Grateful Living

Expressing care and gratitude is a vital part of grateful living practice. The Network for Grateful Living offers lovely, free e-cards for you to send to those who need some inspiration. Make someone’s day. Make a connection. Make a difference. For your sake, and for the benefit of others. 

To learn more and see the collection.

If you have something to add to Gathered Wisdom, send it to Marjorie George at
marjoriegeorge62@gmail.com

Gathered Wisdom is from The Wisdom Years, a ministry that invites older adults to deepening spirituality in the last third of their lives. If someone forwarded this to you, learn more about The Wisdom Years and subscribe to the site at
ww.wisdomyears.org.

Gathered Wisdom, Feb. 2

A weekly collection of inspiration and resources for the journey, gathered from websites, books, and pass-alongs that have been shared with us. From The Wisdom Years – Spirituality for the Last Third of Our Lives.

Praying

by Mary Oliver

It doesn’t have to be
the blue iris, it could be
weeds in a vacant lot, or a few
small stones; just
pay attention, then patch

a few words together and don’t try
to make them elaborate, this isn’t
a contest but the doorway

into thanks, and a silence in which
another voice may speak.

From Devotions – The Selected Poems of Mary Oliver

On-demand e-courses for Lent

From Spirituality and Practice

With on-demand e-courses, you study independently and schedule the pace of the course yourself. Once you subscribe, you choose how often you want to receive the material. The Spirituality and Practice website offers courses from teachers such as Thomas Moore, Fr. Thomas Keating, Rami Shapiro and others. Ash Wednesday is February 17.

To see the selection and for more info.

Crossing the Threshold: Contemplative Foundations for Emerging Leaders

From the Shalem Institute

Crossing the Threshold is a program to nurture the spiritual life and strengthen the contemplative foundation of those who sense their grounding in God and want support/mentoring as they seek to cross the threshold to claim their call to leadership and all of life, living from this contemplative foundation.

This is a 19-month program with 2 residencies on Zoom.  Early Bird Deadline is March 1.  Program begins in April, 2021.  Scholarships are available.

A free information sessions will be offered Feb 18 at 5 pm (ET).

Learn more here.

Tending the Rituals of Our Lives: A Practice Invitation

Begins Sunday, Feb. 14
From A Network for Grateful Living

From small, daily practices to the most important moments of our lives, rituals guide our journey; bind us to one another in celebration, gratitude, and loss; and return us to ourselves when we are most in need. They become the cairns along the trail of our lives, offering direction and clarity, meaning and reassurance. Often, they hold the keys to transformation.

For more info.

A Stone’s Throw Away from Everybody

by Fr. Ron Rolheiser

“How far is a stone’s throw? It’s distance enough to leave you in a place where no one can reach you. Just as we come out of the womb alone, we leave this earth alone. Jesus faced his death knowing that he was loved by others but also knowing that in the face of death he was entering a place where he was deeply and utterly alone.”

Read the essay.

Fr. Ron is teaching at several upcoming retreats and workshops via Zoom. He is a wonderful teacher, and the events are moderately-priced. Highly recommended.

See the list here.

Words That Matter and Things That Matter

by Diana Butler Bass

“We need the counter-cultural practice of silence right now. This month, I’ve been thinking a lot about silence — and longing for it. Perhaps because of the January 6 madness, the screaming of the rioters, the QAnon lies. But partly because of the breathless, continuous outrage on social media and in the news. There’s a continual demand to take sides, speak out, prove one isn’t “complicit” with whatever structural injustice has become viral on any given day.”

Read more.

If you have something to add to Gathered Wisdom, send it to Marjorie George at
marjoriegeorge62@gmail.com

Gathered Wisdom is from The Wisdom Years, a ministry that invites older adults to deepening spirituality in the last third of their lives. If someone forwarded this to you, learn more about The Wisdom Years and subscribe to the site at
ww.wisdomyears.org.



Gathered Wisdom, Jan 26

Identity

God helps us remember our true identity, or as St. Paul would say, we let ourselves be no longer an “I,” but an “I in Christ.” And as we learn to let go of our attachment to all the things we might think we are, and rest in our real identity, the question of what we’re supposed to do in the world becomes a little easier to navigate. It starts feeling like God is the one making choices through us, as our false selves fade into the background.

-Br. Nicholas Bartoli
Society of St. John the Evangelist

Moving on Through Forgiveness

An 8-week online study from The Wisdom Years
Thursdays, 4 to 5 pm, beginning February 4

In this pre-Lent/Lenten offering, we will look at various aspects of forgiveness from several spiritual writers and see how each fits into our own life stories. Each week will include some on-your-own reading, a brief teaching, and small-group exercises with discussion on Zoom. Materials will be provided. 

For more info and to reserve your spot.

What Needs To Be Left Behind? 

Sermon by the Rev. Mike Marsh

“Follow me,” isn’t only about going somewhere, it’s also about leaving behind. That’s the hard part for most of us. We’re pretty good at accumulating and clinging but not so good at letting go. More often than not, however, growth involves some kind of letting go. We accept Jesus’ invitation to follow, not by packing up, but by letting go.”

Read the sermon.

A Face, Searched out and Known 

Sermon by Br. Sean Glenn of Society of St. John the Evangelist

“The days and months ahead will likely not be easy. For when the last vaccine has been administered, when the last livelihood that was taken away is restored, we will still have to find a way to live with one another in this night of disunion; as a nation, as a neighborhood, as a work place, as a family, as a church.”

Read the sermon.

Our Struggle in Faith – Between Knowing It is True and Believing It

Essay from Fr. Ron Rolheiser of Oblate Seminary

“Some years ago, at a workshop, a woman came up to me during the break and sai: “God loves me unconditionally. I know that’s true, but I how can I make myself believe it? I simply can’t!” She could have been speaking for half of the human race. We know we are loved by God, we can say the words, but how do we make ourselves believe that? Why? Why is that so difficult to believe?”

Read the essay.

What is the Kingdom of God?

A podcast from Renovare

Renovare introduces a new podcast series called Friends in Formation. In this first edition, James Catford, Richella Parham and Nathan Foster dis­cuss the King­dom of God, pan­dem­ic lone­li­ness, and prac­ti­cal ways to remem­ber that even when we are sep­a­rat­ed we are more togeth­er than we can see.

Listen to the podcast.

Becoming & Belonging

A webinar from Sage-ing Interntional

with Ben McBride
Thursday
February 11
4:00pm – 5:15pm ET

“Ben shares personal stories that credential his experience as a trusted messenger around the ideas of becoming and belonging anchored in individual and institutional choices he made around creating social change. Ben then situates a meta-narrative about United States history and how we, in modern times, have inherited a story that we did not author and are at a historical choice point around how we navigate that intersection.”

For more information and to register.

Walking in the Wilderness

An Online Lenten Retreat from The Upper Room
Ash Wednesday, Feb. 17, through Easter Sunday, Apr. 4

“Living through social and political upheaval can sometimes feel a lot like wandering in exile through a spiritual desert. The Upper Room invites you to join us this Lent for an online retreat in which we will hold sacred space for one another and connect with God throughout each day. You may feel like you are walking in the wilderness, but you are not alone. The Holy Spirit travels with us.”

For more information and to register.

If you have something to add to Gathered Wisdom, send it to Marjorie George at
marjoriegeorge62@gmail.com

Gathered Wisdom is from The Wisdom Years, a ministry that invites older adults to deepening spirituality in the last third of their lives. If someone forwarded this to you, learn more about The Wisdom Years and subscribe to the site at
ww.wisdomyears.org.

Gathered Wisdom, Jan. 19

The sky is coming apart and together at the same time.

by Maya Stein

And the body is holding its losses like a fist. And a fleshy hope
is opening to an unprecedented vastness. And whatever we think
we are leaving behind will keep insisting. And the things we desire
will elude us. And our efforts will pose as failure. And we will not recognize
how far we’ve come. And we will solve one problem and create another.
And we will feel broken. And we will not be broken. And the silence
will be deafening. And we will love destructively. And no one
will appear to be listening. And there will be too many doors
to choose from. And we will keep saying, “I don’t know how to do this.”
And we will be more capable than we ever imagined.

The poet writes: * I have borrowed the title from my friend Karen. It appeared as a caption to a photo she posted on Instagram.

Found on A Network for Grateful Living

More from Maya Stein

Inauguration Prayer Vigil on Zoom

Shalem Institute for Spiritual Formation will host a prayer vigil on Tuesday, Jan. 19, from 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm (ET) and on Wednesday, Jan. 20, from 8:00 am to 1:00 pm (ET). (Please note: Prayer for the World will not be happening this week. We invite you to join the Inauguration Prayer Vigil instead.)

Each hour of the vigil, on the hour, a leader will offer prayerful guidance around a contemplative practice leading into extended silence. We invite you to join us for an hour or for a part of the day. We encourage you to arrive on Zoom on the hour, if possible.

For more info.

Moving on Through Forgiveness

An 8-week online study from The Wisdom Years

Thursdays, 4 to 5 pm, beginning February 4

In this pre-Lent/Lenten offering, we will look at various aspects of forgiveness from several spiritual writers and see how each fits into our own life stories. Each week will include some on-your-own reading, a brief teaching, and small-group exercises with discussion on Zoom. Materials will be provided. 

For more info and to reserve your spot.

Talk to Each Other

Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Michael Curry invites one-on-one conversations in the new program “From Many, One: Conversations Across Difference.” The campaign seeks to encourage listening and sharing across the many differences that separate us. “Conversation with others across difference is not just a nice thing to do,” said Bishop Curry. “It is a spiritual practice of love in action.” The conversations center on four questions: What do you love? What have you lost? Where does it hurt? What do you dream?
Echoing the Latin phrase on the U.S. seal – E Pluribus (“from many”) Unum (“one”) – and following in the footsteps of Jesus, said Curry, “We trust that the spiritual practice of conversation across difference can help to knit us all into a diverse, more perfect union.”

For information on how to engage.

The Invitation to a Deeper Empathy

Beyond anger, beyond indignation, and beyond justified criticism of all that’s dishonest and unjust, lies an invitation to a deeper empathy. This invitation doesn’t ask us to be stop being prophetic in the face of what’s wrong but it asks us to be prophetic in a deeper way. A prophet, as Daniel Berrigan so often said, makes a vow of love not of alienation.

Read the entire essay.

Spiritual Formation in Today’s World

A one-year online offering from The Academy for Spiritual Formation
Incorporating the elements of community, wisdom teaching, worship, and stillness, the four three-day online sessions will follow a modified Benedictine Daily Office, as well as invite participants into communal formation with the same cohort throughout the year.

For more info.

Note: Deadline to register is February 1.

If you have something to add to Gathered Wisdom, send it to Marjorie George at
marjoriegeorge62@gmail.com

Gathered Wisdom is from The Wisdom Years, a ministry that invites older adults to deepening spirituality in the last third of their lives. If someone forwarded this to you, learn more about The Wisdom Years and subscribe to the site at
ww.wisdomyears.org.

Moving on Through Forgiveness – A Lenten Study

Starts February 4, two weeks before Ash Wednesday.

An 8- week online Pre-Lent and Lenten study 

from The Wisdom Years

Feb 4 to March 25, 2021

Thursdays, 4 to 5:15 p.m.

Forgive and forget. We’ve been told that all our lives. And really, most of us would if we could. Yes, we know that resentment hurts us more than our enemies. But if forgetting must be part of our forgiveness, the task may be impossible, no matter how much we pray over it. 

Perhaps, remember and move on is better advice. Sometimes, we really were wronged; the offense was committed. Reconciliation may not be possible or even advisable. And sometimes we are the one who has committed the offense; how do we then move toward reconciliation? 

In this 8-week study we will consider forgiveness from the perspective of several writers who are known for their wisdom.  Each week we will read a different author, then practice little steps toward forgiveness throughout the week.

Each week will include

a reading on an aspect of forgiveness by a well-known spiritual writer

questions for reflection and discussion

a calendar of daily activities

small-group discussion by Zoom

Facilitators will be

Marjorie George – marjoriegeorge62@gmail.com

Carla Pineda – carlaleedpineda@gmail.com

The Rev. Patricia Riggins – prriggins@satx.rr.com

To reserve your spot in the study or for questions, send an email to one of the facilitators. 

 

Gathered Wisdom, Jan. 12, 2021

Hope is a state of mind, not of the world. Hope, in this deep and powerful sense, is not the same as joy that things are going well, or willingness to invest in enterprises that are obviously heading for success, but rather an ability to work for something because it is good, not because it stands for a chance to succeed.

— Vaclav Havel in Lyrics for Re-Creation by James Conlon

Presiding Bishop Curry’s Word to the Church: Who Shall we Be?

From Episcopal News Service
Jan 8, 2021

“I am a follower of Jesus of Nazareth,” said Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, two days after the siege of the U. S. Capitol, “because I believe that his way of love and his way of life is the way of life for us all. I believe that unselfish, sacrificial love, love that seeks the good and the welfare and the well-being of others, as well as the self, that this is the way that can lead us and guide us to do what is just, to do what is right, to do what is merciful. It is the way that can lead us beyond the chaos to community.” 

Watch a video of Bishop Curry’s words to the Church, or read the transcript.

What is Loving Asking of Us Now?

By Fr. Ron Rolheiser
Oblate Seminary, San Antonio TX

“We live in a time of bitter division. From our government offices down to our kitchen tables there are tensions and divisions about politics, religion, and versions of truth that seem irreparable.  Sadly, these divisions have brought out the worst in us, in all of us.” 

Read the essay.

All Are Responsible 

By the Rev. Mike Marsh, rector of St. Philip’s Episcopal Church, Uvalde TX
From a sermon preached on Sunday, Jan. 10.

 “Last week, some of you may remember, I ended my sermon by asking this question: Will we, in 2021, be different from and better than how we were in 2020? There’s not much about the first ten days of 2021 that suggests we will. I think it’s still an open question and, I hope, still a possibility. But after the events of last Wednesday and the assault on our nation’s capitol I’m just not so sure we will be.  As I reflect on the events of last Wednesday I keep going back to words from Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel, ‘Few are guilty, but all are responsible’.”

Read the rest of the sermon.

A preview of Lenten resources

Moving on Through Forgiveness

An 8-week online study from The Wisdom Years

Forgive and forget. We’ve been told that all our lives. And really, most of us would if we could. Yes, we know that resentment hurts us more than our enemies. But if forgetting must be part of our forgiveness, the task may be impossible, no matter how much we pray over it.  Perhaps, remember and move on is better advice.

To learn more and reserve your spot.

Come, Pray

From Society of St. John the Evangelist

Across the weeks of Lent, listen in as Brothers discuss the rich and varied ways we pray, together in church and in our personal prayer. The series is centered on a weekly 20-minute video and invites participants to explore and experience diverse prayer practices alongside the Brothers through joining their regular, live-streamed worship, special services, and online teachings.

To sign up for the weekly email: SSJE.org/subscribe and select “Monastic Wisdom for everyday living.” 

Praying with the Gospel of John

From The Society of St. John the Evangelist
Tuesdays: February 9, 16, 23, March 2 (not March 9), 16, 23, 30, and April 6, 2021
7:30-8:15pm EST. 

The Fourth Gospel is at the heart of the “Johannine spirituality” lived by the Brothers of the Society of St John the Evangelist. It is a spirituality of love and intimacy, of abiding in Jesus and in the Father, of laying down of one’s life in service of others, of being sent into the world to reveal God’s love to those who don’t yet know it, and of witnessing to what we have seen and heard so that others may find the joy and love that God so wants to give them.

Led by Br. David Vryhof, SSJE. Beginning February 9, 2021.

For more info.

Living Well Through Lent – Listening with All Your Heart, Soul, Strength, and Mind

From Living Compass

Designed for use as an individual reflection or for group study, this guide provides a foundation for seeking a deeper experience of Lent, an experience that will help prepare us for the true meaning of Easter. The study will include reflections from: Martha Bourlakis, Robbin Brent, Randall Curtis, Donald Fishburne, Jan Kwiatkowski, Heidi Kim, Malcolm McLaurin, Craig Phillips, Lisa Saunders, Scott Stoner, and Dawna Wall. The study is available both in print and digital format

For more info.

To Live Anew

By Joan Chittister

Lent is a summons to live anew. But how do you do that? In six brief but powerful reflections on one of the Sunday readings, Sister Joan offers insight into how “living anew” might look in these extraordinary times of pandemic and political upheaval. She also introduces six companions—one for each week of Lent—to walk with you during these 40 days of spiritual renewal. Each “companion” embodies a special quality for spiritual growth: Thomas Merton brings the gift of contemplation; Teresa of Avila, the gift of prayer; Rachel Carson, the gift of awe of creation; Oscar Romero, the gift of prophecy; Sojourner Truth, the gift of joy; Mother Jones, the gift of speaking your truth. 

For information.

If you have something to add to Gathered Wisdom, send it to Marjorie George at
marjoriegeorge62@gmail.com

Gathered Wisdom is from The Wisdom Years, a ministry that invites older adults to deepening spirituality in the last third of their lives. If someone forwarded this to you, learn more about The Wisdom Years and subscribe to the site at
ww.wisdomyears.org.

Gathered Wisdom, January 5 – resend copy

The first send of this post had a glitch. We are resending it with apologies.

A weekly collection of inspiration and resources for the journey, gathered from websites, books, and pass-alongs that have been shared with us. From The Wisdom Years – Spirituality for the Last Third of Our Lives.

I Become the Elder

Leaving behind my journey of struggling and racing
Through the white water of many rivers,
I become the river, creating my own unique way.

Leaving behind my self-imposed role as a tree upon
Which others have leaned, I now become the wind,
With freedom to blow whenever and wherever I choose.

Download the full poem.

Good reads this week

Fr. Ron Rolheiser on Making and Breaking New Year’s Resolutions

In making new resolutions we are saying: “I believe in a God who continues to love me, even when I can’t live up to it.” Every time I pick myself off the floor after a fall and begin again with some hope in my heart looking for a new start, I am saying the creed in a way that is considerably more radical, in terms of expressing actual belief in God, than is my too-easy Sunday recital of it. To make a new resolution is to believe in God.

Read it.

Bishop Jennifer Brooke-Davidson on the Unpredictable-ness of Epiphany

The word EPIPHANY comes from the Greek and means, loosely translated, “Dang – didn’t see THAT coming in a million years!”   Other preachers will tell you that Epiphany means a “showing” or “revealing,” and that’s not wrong. The thing is, a “showing” of God is NEVER EVER EVER what we expect. Epiphany means “I make plans; God laughs out loud.”   Epiphany means a breakthrough, a rip in the veil, a brief interlude in another dimension of reality.

Read it.

Marthe Curry – Emmaus Now

This past year, 2020, has been a great international leveler.  Not one country has escaped the Corona virus; all have suffered.  In our country, we were experiencing unprecedented economic prosperity and growth; joblessness was at a record low; opportunities seemed to be limitless.  We were barely into the new year when the virus struck a blow that upended the whole world.  And it changed our lives.

Read the post.

Listen

Do we have a Savior?

An audio sermon from SSJE
 Did his coming make a difference?  Has the Savior actually saved us?  If the Messiah has come, and if he now reigns, why is there still such suffering and chaos in the world? We say we have a Savior, but it often appears that we still need one. Br. David Vryhof of the Society of St John the Evangelist steps into the complicated “already, but not yet” of God’s promises.

Click to hear the sermon.

e-courses

Awakening the Sage Within 

Jan 16, 17 and 23, 1-4 pm (PT)
$95 to $150
From Sage-ing International

The three-day online event introduces elders to Sage-ing concepts including life review, forgiveness work, and issues surrounding mortality. Includes development of a personalized plan for eldering, including service to others and leaving a legacy.  

More info

Quiet Prophecy: Another Kind of Protest for Social and Religious Transformation

Wednesdays, March 10-24, 7-9 p.m. (CT)
$30 
From Oblate Seminary

What if you are not the type of person who can openly protest things and openly challenge others? What are your prophetic gifts? How can your quiet gifts challenge the world and the church to be more just, more loving, and more faith-filled? Is there another kind of “protest” that is powerfully prophetic? Principles for Quiet Prophecy.

More info

If you have something to add to Gathered Wisdom, send it to Marjorie George at
marjoriegeorge62@gmail.com

Gathered Wisdom is from The Wisdom Years, a ministry that invites older adults to deepening spirituality in the last third of their lives. If someone forwarded this to you, learn more about The Wisdom Years and subscribe to the site at
ww.wisdomyears.org.

Gathered Wisdom, January 5 – resend

The first send of this post had a glitch. We are resending it with apologies and blaming it on the computer.

A weekly collection of inspiration and resources for the journey, gathered from websites, books, and pass-alongs that have been shared with us. From The Wisdom Years – Spirituality for the Last Third of Our Lives.

I Become the Elder

Leaving behind my journey of struggling and racing
Through the white water of many rivers,
I become the river, creating my own unique way.

Leaving behind my self-imposed role as a tree upon
Which others have leaned, I now become the wind,
With freedom to blow whenever and wherever I choose.

Download the full poem.

Good reads this week

Fr. Ron Rolheiser on Making and Breaking New Year’s Resolutions

In making new resolutions we are saying: “I believe in a God who continues to love me, even when I can’t live up to it.” Every time I pick myself off the floor after a fall and begin again with some hope in my heart looking for a new start, I am saying the creed in a way that is considerably more radical, in terms of expressing actual belief in God, than is my too-easy Sunday recital of it. To make a new resolution is to believe in God.

Read it.

Bishop Jennifer Brooke-Davidson on the Unpredictable-ness of Epiphany

The word EPIPHANY comes from the Greek and means, loosely translated, “Dang – didn’t see THAT coming in a million years!”   Other preachers will tell you that Epiphany means a “showing” or “revealing,” and that’s not wrong. The thing is, a “showing” of God is NEVER EVER EVER what we expect. Epiphany means “I make plans; God laughs out loud.”   Epiphany means a breakthrough, a rip in the veil, a brief interlude in another dimension of reality.

Read it.

Marthe Curry – Emmaus Now

This past year, 2020, has been a great international leveler.  Not one country has escaped the Corona virus; all have suffered.  In our country, we were experiencing unprecedented economic prosperity and growth; joblessness was at a record low; opportunities seemed to be limitless.  We were barely into the new year when the virus struck a blow that upended the whole world.  And it changed our lives.

Read the post.

Listen

Do we have a Savior?

An audio sermon from SSJE
 Did his coming make a difference?  Has the Savior actually saved us?  If the Messiah has come, and if he now reigns, why is there still such suffering and chaos in the world? We say we have a Savior, but it often appears that we still need one. Br. David Vryhof of the Society of St John the Evangelist steps into the complicated “already, but not yet” of God’s promises.

Click to hear the sermon.

e-courses

Awakening the Sage Within 

Jan 16, 17 and 23, 1-4 pm (PT)
$95 to $150
From Sage-ing International

The three-day online event introduces elders to Sage-ing concepts including life review, forgiveness work, and issues surrounding mortality. Includes development of a personalized plan for eldering, including service to others and leaving a legacy.  

More info

Quiet Prophecy: Another Kind of Protest for Social and Religious Transformation

Wednesdays, March 10-24, 7-9 p.m. (CT)
$30 
From Oblate Seminary

What if you are not the type of person who can openly protest things and openly challenge others? What are your prophetic gifts? How can your quiet gifts challenge the world and the church to be more just, more loving, and more faith-filled? Is there another kind of “protest” that is powerfully prophetic? Principles for Quiet Prophecy.

More info

If you have something to add to Gathered Wisdom, send it to Marjorie George at
marjoriegeorge62@gmail.com

Gathered Wisdom is from The Wisdom Years, a ministry that invites older adults to deepening spirituality in the last third of their lives. If someone forwarded this to you, learn more about The Wisdom Years and subscribe to the site at
ww.wisdomyears.org.