Gathered Wisdom, Aug 18

A weekly collection of inspiration and resources for the journey, gathered from websites, books, and pass-alongs that have been shared with us. From Spirituality in the Wisdom Years.

Stillness is vital to the world of the soul. If as you age you become more still, you will discover that stillness can be a great companion. The fragments of your life will have time to unify, and the places where your soul-shelter is wounded or broken will have time to knit and heal. – John O’Donohue, from Anam Cara

This Week:

Cultivating Self-kindness

by Cindy Bunch

Asking yourself two simple questions could be the start of a daily examen without the guilt. Editor Cindy Bunch suggests a way to do the examination of conscience without moving to a place of shame, worry, and despair.

 Notice when you are bugged. That state­ment stopped me short as I was read­ing. The things that bug me can form a low hum in my brain through­out a day. They can spoil — or threat­en to spoil — the oth­er love­ly moments of the day.
Read Two Simple Questions for Cultivating Self-Kindness
FROM: Renovare

Midwives of Hope

by Fr. Ron Rolheiser

In many societies, it is the attendance of a midwife that brings a healthy baby into the world. The same can be said for a good midwife who can bring to life the trust and hope that sometimes get lost in our later years. We not only need midwives, we can be midwives in a world that has become skeptical and cynical.

Something inside us wants to trust, to hope, to believe in the goodness of things, to again feel that trustful enthusiasm we once had as a child, when we were innocent (and “innocent” means “unwounded”), when we could still take another’s hand in trust. No one wants to be outside the circle of trust.

But it’s a struggle, an agony of sorts, as we know. We’d like to trust, but often we can’t give birth to it. That’s where a midwife can be helpful.

Read Midwives of Hope
FROM Ron Rolheiser blog

Enlarging Your Perspective

by Br. Curtis Almquist, SSJE

The little boy on his first flight asked his mom when they would start getting smaller. After all, the airplanes he watched take off from the airport always got smaller as they moved across the sky.

Navigating life faithfully during the Coronavirus epidemic may be a huge challenge for you. Your experience of God may seem to be receding. Where do you look for the stability and permanence you need to navigate life not only in the best of times but in the worst of times? Here are several suggestions.

Read Enlarging Your Perspective
FROM Society of St John the Evangelist

The  Great Adventure Of Growing Older

A video with Carl Honore

Writer Carl Honore turned 50 and changed his mind about what it means to grow older. In this video, Honore looks at ways to combat ageism. 

Many of us have negative views about growing older, but in this insightful TED Talk, award-winning writer Carl Honore encourages us to adopt a new perspective. If we learn to view aging with excitement, wonder, and as one of life’s greatest adventures, we can look to our futures with hope and positivity.

Watch Why We Should View Growing Older as a Great Adventure
FROM Happify Daily

The Wisdom of Wild Grace – an online Weekend Retreat from Ireland

Oct. 3-4, 2020

With Christine Valters Paintner

This two-day virtual retreat over the Feast of St Francis will explore the gift of Earth as our original monastery. Live from Galway, Ireland, sessions will include presentations, reflections, song, meditations, poetry, creative exercises and explorations, gentle movement, small group and partner sharing, guidance for time outside in between sessions, and time for questions and input.

For details and registration
FROM Abbey of the Arts

Tell Your Story

NextAvenue, which defines itself as the “public media’s first and only national journalism service for America’s booming older population,” is looking for original essays with an insightful perspective on aging.  

In a first-of-its-kind initiative for Next Avenue, we would like to invite you, our readers, to tell your stories. From July 24 through August 31, readers age 50+ may submit a 500-word original essay focused on a topic or experience of your choosing. We’re looking for insightful essays that illuminate a truth or teach us something new.

About the essay contest
FROM Next Avenue

If you have something to add to Gathered Wisdom, send it to Marjorie George at
marjoriegeorge62@gmail.com

Gathered Wisdom is from Spirituality in the Wisdom Years, a ministry that invites older adults to deepening spirituality in the last third of their lives. If someone forwarded this to you, learn more about Spirituality in the Wisdom Years and subscribe to the site at
ww.wisdomyears.org.

Gathered Wisdom, Aug. 11

A weekly collection of inspiration and resources for the journey, gathered from websites, books, and pass-alongs that have been shared with us. From Spirituality in the Wisdom Years.

As we come to know our soul gift more clearly, we almost always have to let go of some other “gifts” so we can do our one or two things with integrity. Such letting go frees us from always being driven by what has been called the “tyranny of the urgent.”  Soon urgency is a way of life, and things are not done peacefully from within. What if we choose to simply do one or two things wholeheartedly in our lives? That is all God expects and all we can probably do well. Too much good work becomes a violence to ourselves and, finally, to those around us.

Let’s just use our different gifts to create a unity in the work of service (Ephesians 4:12–13), and back one another up, without criticism or competition. Only in our peaceful, mutual honoring do we show forth the glory of God.

FROM: Richard Rohr Daily Meditations, July 27, 2020. 

This Week:

Gate A-4

By Naomi Shihab Nye  

Poet Naomi Shihab Nye, who lives in San Antonio, made a new friend in the Albuquerque airport, a friend who spoke only Arabic.  Read the lovely story of cultures coming together. “This can still happen anywhere. Not everything is lost,” concludes Nye. 

“Wandering around the Albuquerque Airport Terminal, after learning
my flight had been delayed four hours, I heard an announcement:
‘If anyone in the vicinity of Gate A-4 understands any Arabic, please
come to the gate immediately.’
Well—one pauses these days. Gate A-4 was my own gate. I went there.”
Read the rest of the essay.

FROM: Kolbe Times. 
Find more poetry, essays, and conversations with Joan Chittister, Brian McLaren, Ron Rolheiser, Richard Rohr, and others at Kolbe Times. Subscribe to receive their free magazine. 

Creeping

By Br. James Koester SSJE

We are in a time of not knowing – not knowing what the future will look or when. All we can do is take one step at a time. Or even just creep along.

“There had been moments during the week when I could not imagine it was possible for me to walk another 40, or 30, or 20 miles. What I could imagine, was taking one more step. And so I did. And then another. And another. And another. That week was full of single steps.” Read the rest of the essay

FROM: Society of St. John the Evangelist

A Baptism for the Final Stage of Growth

By Caryl Ann Cosbon

Elaborate preparations are usually made during pregnancy for the new life to come. For Christians, that includes planning for the baby’s baptism. “What might be the equivalent of baptism on the other end of life’s continuum?” asks writer Caryl Ann Casbon.

“The dying often experience major spiritual and relational breakthroughs, even up to the last days of life, when defenses drop and hearts break open. Hospice professionals compare dying to the birth process and helping someone with dying as similar to the role of the midwife assisting at the birth of a baby.” Download the rest of the essay.

FROM: A resource from Center for Courage and Renewal. See their Aging with Wisdom program for upcoming retreats.  http://www.couragerenewal.org

Letting Go of False Fear

It has taken him 50 years to get over his fear of God, says Ron Rolheiser, now president of Oblate Seminary in San Antonio. 

“I’m a cradle Catholic, born to wonderful parents, catechized by some very dedicated teachers, and I’ve had the privilege of studying theology in some of the best classrooms in the world. Still it took me fifty years to rid myself of a number of crippling religious fears and to realize that God is the one person of whom you need not be afraid. It’s taken me most of my life to believe the words that come from God’s mouth over three hundred times in scripture and are the initial words out of the mouth of Jesus whenever he meets someone for the first time after his resurrection: Do not be afraid!” Read the rest of the essay.  

FROM: Ron Rolheiser blog. 

Resources to Combat Loneliness

Books, films, and practices that speak to and help alleviate loneliness. 

FROM: Spirituality and Practice

If you have something to add to Gathered Wisdom, send it to Marjorie George at
marjoriegeorge62@gmail.com

Gathered Wisdom is from Spirituality in the Wisdom Years, a ministry that invites older adults to deepening spirituality in the last third of their lives. If someone forwarded this to you, learn more about Spirituality in the Wisdom Years and subscribe to the site at
ww.wisdomyears.org.

 

Gathered Wisdom Aug. 4

A weekly collection of inspiration and resources for the journey, gathered from websites, books, and pass-alongs that have been shared with us. From Spirituality in the Wisdom Years.

Peace comes from living a measured life. Peace comes from attending to every part of my world in a sacramental way. My relationships are not what I do when I have time left over from my work . . . Reading is not something I do when life calms down. Prayer is not something I do when I feel like it. They are all channels of hope and growth for me. They must all be given their due.

Joan Chittister in Wisdom Distilled from the Daily: Living the Rule of St. Benedict Today 

To Practice This Thought:
For one day, keep track of your activities and the approximate time you give them. What adjustments could you make to use your time more soulfully?

FROM: Spirituality and Practice

This Week:

to read or listen:

Seven Movements of the Second Half of Life

In the second half of life, says Fr. Ron Rolheiser of Oblate Seminary in San Antonio, our struggles are often very different than the first half of life. “And you can see this, biblically, in the parable of the prodigal son and the older brother. The younger son is struggling with all the things of the world – ambition, travel, lust, whatever – while the older brother is struggling much more with anger and coming to peace inside of himself. That’s a much greater struggle.” Rolheiser talks about seven movements to be adopted in the second half of life in a recent interview with Kolbe Times magazine.

FROM: Kolbe Times

Wisdom Cries Out

“How can I learn to be still? How can I make peace with a solitude I did not choose? How can I help my neighbor? How can I overcome the racism etched on my bones by my ancestors? How should we live? What does God desire? How is God involved? How can I love a God who is so mysterious? What is the Church called to become?” These are the questions we are asking today, the questions of those who hunger and thirst for wisdom, says Br. Keith Nelson of the Society of St John the Evangelist. “The signs of these times are causes and conditions calling for nothing less than the spiritual evolution of the human family: the full flowering of our capacity for Wisdom,” he says. Listen to the podcast or read the text of “The Vindication of Wisdom.” 

FROM: Society of St. John the Evangelist

e-courses
Bringing Back Elder Wisdom

In former times, our “elders” were keepers of wisdom and leaders through times of change and evolution. They held the stories that kept communities and society safe and provided touchstones for well-being and a sense of identity. True elders are soul travelers – not just chronologically, but also spiritually and intellectually: reaching back and reaching forward, reaching in and reaching out into the world and the human ecology that connects us. This online retreat from the Center for Courage and Renewal welcomes individuals seeking the opportunity for reflection and renewal as a means of illuminating their own life journey, or enhancing their leadership role in work, organizational or community settings. Learn more about the retreat

FROM: Center for Courage and Renewal 

practices

Through the Lens of Contemplation

If you enjoy reflecting on your experiences through the glimpses of life you discover by taking photos, then the Contemplative Photographers Practice Group may be for you. Now in its sixth year, this supportive community receives a theme suggestion every week, and members share photos, ideas, and inspiration with each other. Newcomers and returning members are welcome. Learn about it.

FROM: Spirituality and Practice 

Put Yourself in the Story

Ignatian contemplation, also known as Composition of Place, involves “composing the place” by imagining yourself in the story of scripture. Using our imagination, we place ourselves in the scene of the story, engaging our senses with wonder.  A post from Grow Christians does a walk-through of the Feeding of the 5,000, but this exercise is fruitful with any scripture. Engage the practice. 

FROM: Grow Christians

watch for
Black Church Documentary Coming to PBS

A two-part PBS series hosted by Henry Louis Gates Jr is scheduled to run next year and look at the deep history of the Black church and culture of African American faith communities. Gates has said that the Black Church is a “story of grace and resilience, struggle and redemption, hope and healing.”  The documentary will feature interviews with Oprah Winfrey, John Legend, Jennifer Hudson, Bishop Michael Curry, Cornel West, Pastor Shirley Caesar and the Rev. Al Sharpton. Gates is a literary critic and academic who’s become well known as the host of the popular Finding Your Roots series. Learn more.

FROM: Relevant Magazine

Gathered Wisdom, July 28

A weekly collection of inspiration and resources for the journey, gathered from websites, books, and pass-alongs that have been shared with us. From Spirituality in the Wisdom Years.

A Blessing for Old Age

By John O’Donohue

May the light of your soul mind you,
May all your worry and anxiousness about becoming old be transfigured,
May you be given a wisdom with the eye of your soul,
to see this beautiful time of harvesting.
May you have the commitment to harvest your life,
to heal what has hurt you, to allow it to come closer to you and become one with you.
May you have great dignity, may you have a sense of how free you are,
And above all may you be given the wonderful gift of meeting the eternal light and beauty that is within you.
May you be blessed, and may you find a wonderful love in yourself for yourself.

From the book To Bless the Space Between Us

This Week

Turning Prayer into Action

Maybe we can’t do all of the things we used to do before the pandemic, but Bishop Michael Curry says there are many things we can do. It is our prayer that will lead us to the right actions, he says in this week’s Habits of Grace video.  Bishop  Curry, the thoroughly delightful and deeply spiritual leader of the Episcopal Church, posts a video meditation every week as we travel through this pandemic. The meditations can be watched at any time by clicking here.

For more about Michael Curry, from The Episcopal Church 

When What is Precious is Taken From You

“Perhaps the reality that is hardest of all to accept in life is the unalterable fact that everything that is precious to us will, in some way, eventually be taken away,” says Fr. Ron Rolheiser of Oblate Seminary. “We are left wondering what we really believe in and what really can be trusted,” he says. Read the essay.

From: Fr. Ron’s blog

Retreating Where You Are

You kept telling yourself you would take a retreat day, but now you really are out of excuses. “Retreat, at heart, is simply about making ourselves available to God,” say the brothers at Society of St. John the Evangelist.  What better time than while we are confined to home and our calendars are empty. The brothers have created an outline of a simple and possible “retreat in place” day from preparation to conclusion. Access it here.

From: Society of St. john the Evangelist. 

Listen!

Learning to listen is a lifelong journey that starts with the healing of the wounds that get in the way, says Heather Plett, an author and blogger who is particularly committed to the concept of “holding space.” In this article, she discusses learning to listen to those who are closest to her – her three grown children. Read it.

From: Heather Plett blog

As It Is: Spiritual Journaling e-course

Led by Judith Favor from Spirituality and Practice
Monday, August 3 – Friday, August 28

This course on spiritual journaling starts with three words from the Lord’s Prayer  – as it is – to invite deep questions about today’s world. Through contemplative writing, participants will get practice in recognizing and responding to their relationship with God, self, others, nature, work, and society just “as it is.” For more information.

From: Spirituality and Practice 

Gathered Wisdom is from Spirituality in the Wisdom Years, a ministry that invites older adults to deepening spirituality in the last third of their lives. If someone forwarded this to you, learn more about Spirituality in the Wisdom Years and subscribe to the site at
ww.wisdomyears.org.

If you have something to add to Gathered Wisdom, send it to Marjorie George at
marjoriegeorge62@gmail.com

Gathered Wisdom, July 21

A weekly collection of inspiration and resources for the journey, gathered from websites, books, and pass-alongs that have been shared with us. From Spirituality in the Wisdom Years.

There is an old story about a man who wrote to the department of agriculture in his state to find out how to cope with the crabgrass that was spoiling his lawn. The department responded with a number of suggestions. The man tried them all, but he could not completely eliminate the crabgrass. Exasperated, he wrote the department again, noting that every method they had suggested had failed. His yard was still riddled with crabgrass.
He got back a short reply: “We suggest you learn to love it.”
That is the art of reframing, redefining something so that it is no longer as problematic. It isn’t the situation that is changed, of course; it is your perspective on the situation.

— Robert and Jeanette Lauer in Watersheds: Mastering Life’s Unpredictable Crises by Robert and Jeanette Lauer

To Practice This Thought:
Examine an old and persistent problem from a new angle.

Discover more wisdom and practices at
SpiritualityandPractice.com

This Week

Ten More Commandments

Drawing from all that is best from Judeo-Christian scripture, and especially from the wisdom and example of Jesus, Fr. Ron Rolhesier, president of Oblate School of Theology in San Antonio, has pulled together Ten Commandments for Mature Living. Read it in a lovely booklet created by Shari Guilfoile of Everyday Faith.

From: Everyday Faith 

Tai Chi Helps

A study of 670 older adults, all of whom were at increased risk of falling, reduced their risk by 58 percent after taking Tai Chi classes, as reported in the May/June 2019 issue of Arthritis Today magazine. Tai Chi appears to be more effective in reducing fall risk than other forms of stretching, balance, flexibility and strengthening exercises. When they did fall, participants in the study were less likely to suffer serious injury. Terry Gay Puckett, who recommends and teaches Tai Chi Chih, suggests looking for online Tai Chi Chih classes with Justin Stone.  Find them here.

From: Terry Gay Puckett. To learn more about Tai Chi Chih, contact Terry Gay.

Falling Silent

Essay by Gerard Thomas Straub.  In his book No Man Is an Island, Thomas Merton wrote: “There must be a time of day when the man who makes plans forgets his plans, and acts as if he had no plan at all.  There must be a time of day when the man who has to speak falls very silent. And his mind forms no more propositions, and he asks himself: Did they have any meaning?
Read the rest of the essay by clicking on the download box below

From: Bridges to Contemplative Living with Thomas Merton Advent and Christmas, 2010, edited by Jonathan Montaldo and Robert G. Toth, published by Ave Maria Press.  

The Long Distance Movie Club

A pair of young people in New York have come up with a genius idea for bringing isolated seniors together – watch old movies and talk about them in online discussions. Watch the video about the Long Distance Movie Club, then think about how you could apply this in your congregation.  

From: Happify Daily. Happify.com

Where to find old movies

Using Zoom

Older adults are finding they can connect with friends, attend book studies, and go to webinars online using Zoom. If you are new to Zoom, here are some videos to get you started. Or call a grandchild.

From the Creative Life Center (our favorite)

From AARP 

From Zoom

If you have something to add to Gathered Wisdom, send it to Marjorie George at
marjoriegeorge62@gmail.com

Gathered Wisdom is from Spirituality in the Wisdom Years, a ministry that invites older adults to deepening spirituality in the last third of their lives. If someone forwarded this to you, learn more about Spirituality in the Wisdom Years and subscribe to the site at
ww.wisdomyears.org.

Gathered Wisdom, July 14

A weekly collection of inspiration and resources for the journey, gathered from websites, books, and pass-alongs that have been shared with us. From Spirituality in the Wisdom Years.

I Worried

I worried a lot. Will the garden grow, will the rivers
flow in the right direction, will the earth turn
as it was taught, and if not how shall
I correct it?

Was I right, was I wrong, will I be forgiven,
can I do better?

Will I ever be able to sing, even the sparrows
can do it and I am, well,
hopeless.

Is my eyesight fading or am I just imagining it,
am I going to get rheumatism,
lockjaw, dementia?

Finally I saw that worrying had come to nothing.
And gave it up. And took my old body
and went out into the morning,
and sang.”

― Mary Oliver

From: Swan: Poems and Prose Poems

This Week

First Half/Second Half

In the first half of life, says Fr. Richard Rohr, we are rightly concerned with establishing our identity in the world. Rohr calls it building a “container.” But in the second half of life, we finally must decide what the container was meant to hold if we are to complete the life to which we are called. The two halves of life are the subject of Rohr’s 2011 book Falling Upward. He re-visits the topic in his daily meditations for March 17-22, 2019. Access each day’s offering from the end-of-week summary.  Suggestion: read one a day for a week; take 15 minutes to think about it.

From: Center for Action and Contemplation

Living COVID Like a Monk

Fr. Ron Rolheiser’s 10 suggestions for getting through the aloneness of the COVID pandemic come from watching and knowing monks. His thoughts, he says, are the fruit of living in the give-and-take of a religious community for 50 years. Read Some Secrets Worth Knowing

From: Fr. Ron Rolheiser’s blog

Shut Out by the Pandemic

A 95-year-old woman in San Antonio is the longest-tenured election judge in the Bexar County Elections Department.  She couldn’t work the July primary runoff election thanks to the pandemic. Once an airplane mechanic, in her retirement she has always kept busy, these days sewing masks for anyone who needs one.  Read the story of this inspirational 95-year-old..

From: The Rivard Report

The Tragic Gap – a podcast

Can we stand in that place between the present hard realities and what we know is possible? Parker Palmer calls it The Tragic Gap – we see it, for instance, when we witness outrageous greed in our society but also see examples of extraordinary generosity for our neighbor. How can we as elders stand in that gap in our homes, in our communities, in our nation? Listen to the podcast.

From: The Center for Courage and Renewal

Eight Gates to Elderhood

“Becoming a Wise Elder” e-course is part of the Elder Spirituality Project from Spirituality & Practice. The course recognizes that the demands of elderhood are far different from those of earlier years and presents eight gates through which elders must pass. In the online course, participants work at their own speed and frequency. Learn more about the course here.

From: Spirituality and Practice

Gathered Wisdom is from Spirituality in the Wisdom Years, a ministry that invites older adults to deepening spirituality in the last third of their lives. If someone forwarded this to you, learn more about Spirituality in the Wisdom Years and subscribe to the site at
ww.wisdomyears.org.

If you have something to add to Gathered Wisdom, send it to Marjorie George at
marjoriegeorge62@gmail.com

Gathered Wisdom for July 7

A weekly collection of inspiration and resources for the journey, gathered from websites, books, and pass-alongs that have been shared with us. From Spirituality in the Wisdom Years.

There is No Going Back

No, no, there is no going back.
Less and less you are that possibility you were.
More and more you have become those lives and deaths
that have belonged to you. You have become a sort of grave
containing much that was and is no more in time,
beloved then, now, and always.
And so you have become a sort of tree standing over a grave.
Now more than ever you can be generous toward each day that comes, young,
to disappear forever, and yet remain unaging in the mind.
Every day you have less reason not to give yourself away. 

 – Wendell Berry, from “Collected Poems”

This Week

Quieting Your Soul – a podcast

This enlightening podcast is for everyone who is an “over” – over-achiever, over-controller, over-perfectionist. Listen for yourself or pass on to others.  Nathan Foster of Renovare interviews Lane Cohee, author of the new book The Disquieted Soul.  Listen here. https://renovare.org/podcast/lane-cohee-the-disquieted-soul

From: Renovare, a Chris­t­ian non­prof­it founded by Richard J. Foster, author of Celebration of Discipline. renovare.org

When Old and Young Connect

Older and younger people benefit each other. When teenagers in the Big Brothers and Big Sisters program were coupled with older mentors, they experienced a 46 percent difference in drug use, a 50 percent difference in school truancy, and a 33 percent difference in violent behavior compared to teens who did not have mentors. The older mentors were three times as likely to be happy than older adults who are not mentors. Read the article. https://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/what_happens_when_old_and_young_connect

From: the Greater Good Science Center https://ggsc.berkeley.edu/who_we_are

Steady Spirituality

Everything in our spirituality doesn’t have to be moving forward all the time. Sometimes we need to be in maintenance mode, remembering that the spiritual journey is a marathon, not a sprint. “Good spiritualities don’t put you on a universal conveyor belt, the same road for everyone, but take into account what you need to do to maintain your energy and sanity on a marathon journey,” says Fr. Ron Rolheiser, president of Oblate Seminary in San Antonio. Read the full article.
https://ronrolheiser.com/ascending-descending-and-just-keeping-steady

From: Ron Rolheiser,OMI. ronrolheiser.com

At-Home Retreat

While you are stuck inside, carve out some intentional time to get quiet and be with God.  Br. Luke Ditewig of Society of St John the Evangelist suggests several ways to do it.  
https://www.ssje.org/2020/04/29/retreat-at-home-during-coronavirus/

From: Society of St. John the Evangelist ssje.org

From Age-ing to Sage-ing – a workshop

Awakening the Sage Within online workshop introduces the concepts promoted by Sage-ing International and based on the work of Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi in his book From Age-ing to Sage-ing. “Sage-ing”  is a model for engaging more deliberately, more joyfully and more compassionately as we grow older. Practices center on personal growth and service as one grows into becoming an “elder.” The course will meet online three Tuesdays in August. Learn about Sage-ing International and the course. http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07eh1x2idff9685403&llr=thw4kyfab

Investigate Sage-ing as Spiritual Practice
https://www.sage-ing.org/about/sage-ing-as-a-spiritual-practice/

Listen

We need to be careful about judging the old ones when we talk. At first they may not make sense to us. Maybe we’ll say they’re old fashioned and don’t understand. But the old ones do understand! When they speak, listen very carefully. Often it will take weeks or maybe even years before we understand what they are really saying. This is the way of Wisdom. We need to listen, listen, listen.

from Meditations with Native American Elders: The Four Seasons

Gathered Wisdom is from Spirituality in the Wisdom Years, a ministry that invites older adults to deepening spirituality in the last third of their lives. If someone forwarded this to you, learn more about Spirituality in the Wisdom Years and subscribe to the site at
ww.wisdomyears.org.

If you have something to add to Gathered Wisdom, send it to Marjorie George at
marjoriegeorge62@gmail.com

Gathered Wisdom

To know the guidance of God’s Spirit, you need to be still and silent. In the cadence of your day, create some enclosures of silence where you pause and breathe and are really present to God’s presence.
-Br. Curtis Almquist, SSJE.
Learn more about the Society of Saint John the Evangelist

This Week

Students and Seniors use Technology to Cure Loneliness

In this time of increased isolation for older people, a group of students from Austin has created “video pals” with seniors. Both age groups benefit as they connect across the generations. Watch the video.
Found in Happify Daily https://my.happify.com

How the Daily News Increases Anxiety and what to do About It

If you feel yourself caught up in a cycle of fear, anger, and despair as you digest all the latest news of a world and people in crisis, you owe it to yourself and the world to be kind to yourself and take a break says Brother Nicholas Bartoli of the Society of St. John the Evangelist. Now is the time for elders to be peacemakers of themselves and those in their families. Read the article.
From Society of St. John the Evangelist.

Leaving Peace as our Final Gift

There is a way of dying that leaves peace behind, says Fr. Richard Rolheiser, president of Oblate Seminary in San Antonio. That peace involves harmony and completeness. Read Leaving Peace Behind as our Farewell Gift from Father Ron’s blog.

Volunteering Without Leaving Home

Older adults are called to be blessings, but in this time of sheltering at home, that can be hard to do. The Volunteer Match program offers ways to volunteer from home. Read 10 Ways to Volunteer from Home from the Volunteer Match blog.

A Walking Meditation

We can still get out and walk during this crisis, and in fact that’s one of the best things we can do for our bodies and our minds. Walking has been shown to decrease depression and increase energy. Author Angeles Arrien invites us to “honor sacred time” with a walking meditation. Read Developing the Inner Visionary at Spirituality and Practice.

A Prayer for Uncertain Times

God of infinite mercy, hear our prayer!

In this time of bewilderment and fear, we ask you to give us the courage to take care of one another as Jesus did. 
For those who are ill, especially those who are frightened and alone, for those who cannot access healthcare, for those who are homeless and lost, 
hear our prayer! 

In the midst of our sadness and grief, we ask you to give us words to comfort one another. 
For those who are dying, and for those who have already died from this virus, for those who tend them and for those with no one to tend them, 
hear our prayer!

In the midst of our own anxiety we ask you to give us the courage to support one another as you would. 
For those who are unexpectedly unemployed, for employers who share what they can, for our government and financial institutions and those who lead them, 
hear our prayer!

In the midst of our struggle to ensure a healthy future for all who live on this planet, we ask you to give us the hope that surpasses our current understanding. 
For healthcare workers, spiritual leaders and our faith communities, for artists and poets, for prophets and teachers, 
hear our prayer!

In the midst of our growing awareness that all life on Earth is connected, we ask for the heart to respect and cherish all life. That all peoples recognize that we are all your children, 
hear our prayer!

We trust in you and your power working in us. Please hear and answer our prayers. Amen. – Sister Cynthia Serjak

From the newsletter of Contemplative Life Bookstore, June 14, 2020 www.contemplative-life.org

Gathered Wisdom is from Spirituality in the Wisdom Years, a ministry that invites older adults to deepening spirituality in the last third of their lives. If someone forwarded this to you, learn more about Spirituality in the Wisdom Years and subscribe to the site at
ww.wisdomyears.org.

If you have something to add to Gathered Wisdom, send it to Marjorie George at
marjoriegeorge62@gmail.com