Gathered Wisdom, July 21

A weekly collection of inspiration and resources for the journey, gathered from websites, books, and pass-alongs that have been shared with us. From Spirituality in the Wisdom Years.

There is an old story about a man who wrote to the department of agriculture in his state to find out how to cope with the crabgrass that was spoiling his lawn. The department responded with a number of suggestions. The man tried them all, but he could not completely eliminate the crabgrass. Exasperated, he wrote the department again, noting that every method they had suggested had failed. His yard was still riddled with crabgrass.
He got back a short reply: “We suggest you learn to love it.”
That is the art of reframing, redefining something so that it is no longer as problematic. It isn’t the situation that is changed, of course; it is your perspective on the situation.

— Robert and Jeanette Lauer in Watersheds: Mastering Life’s Unpredictable Crises by Robert and Jeanette Lauer

To Practice This Thought:
Examine an old and persistent problem from a new angle.

Discover more wisdom and practices at
SpiritualityandPractice.com

This Week

Ten More Commandments

Drawing from all that is best from Judeo-Christian scripture, and especially from the wisdom and example of Jesus, Fr. Ron Rolhesier, president of Oblate School of Theology in San Antonio, has pulled together Ten Commandments for Mature Living. Read it in a lovely booklet created by Shari Guilfoile of Everyday Faith.

From: Everyday Faith 

Tai Chi Helps

A study of 670 older adults, all of whom were at increased risk of falling, reduced their risk by 58 percent after taking Tai Chi classes, as reported in the May/June 2019 issue of Arthritis Today magazine. Tai Chi appears to be more effective in reducing fall risk than other forms of stretching, balance, flexibility and strengthening exercises. When they did fall, participants in the study were less likely to suffer serious injury. Terry Gay Puckett, who recommends and teaches Tai Chi Chih, suggests looking for online Tai Chi Chih classes with Justin Stone.  Find them here.

From: Terry Gay Puckett. To learn more about Tai Chi Chih, contact Terry Gay.

Falling Silent

Essay by Gerard Thomas Straub.  In his book No Man Is an Island, Thomas Merton wrote: “There must be a time of day when the man who makes plans forgets his plans, and acts as if he had no plan at all.  There must be a time of day when the man who has to speak falls very silent. And his mind forms no more propositions, and he asks himself: Did they have any meaning?
Read the rest of the essay by clicking on the download box below

From: Bridges to Contemplative Living with Thomas Merton Advent and Christmas, 2010, edited by Jonathan Montaldo and Robert G. Toth, published by Ave Maria Press.  

The Long Distance Movie Club

A pair of young people in New York have come up with a genius idea for bringing isolated seniors together – watch old movies and talk about them in online discussions. Watch the video about the Long Distance Movie Club, then think about how you could apply this in your congregation.  

From: Happify Daily. Happify.com

Where to find old movies

Using Zoom

Older adults are finding they can connect with friends, attend book studies, and go to webinars online using Zoom. If you are new to Zoom, here are some videos to get you started. Or call a grandchild.

From the Creative Life Center (our favorite)

From AARP 

From Zoom

If you have something to add to Gathered Wisdom, send it to Marjorie George at
marjoriegeorge62@gmail.com

Gathered Wisdom is from Spirituality in the Wisdom Years, a ministry that invites older adults to deepening spirituality in the last third of their lives. If someone forwarded this to you, learn more about Spirituality in the Wisdom Years and subscribe to the site at
ww.wisdomyears.org.

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